Infrastructure Investment Frontiers

 


 

Infrastructure Investment Frontiers will bring together a select group of globally recognised infrastructure practitioners drawn from the policy, investment, business and civil society communities to forge a new approach to frontier infrastructure investment — to develop new models that can mobilise deep pools of capital at scale and therefore address the massive collective needs for better core economic, transport, logistics, water, waste, sanitation and health infrastructure for frontier economies.


   Wednesday, 5 June,

   6 pm Royal Automobile Club, Cocktails
Participants will meet for an informal discussion on the present and future circumstances of infrastructure investment in frontier economies.

     Thursday, 6 June

9am to 2pm, Forum
Participants will consider a series of key questions that will anchor the day’s conversation including:
  • How far out of step are risk perception and risk reality for frontier economies and their infrastructure needs?
  • What and how will new models of co-investment address the stark gaps of infrastructure provision for frontier economies?
  • Can new forms of community driven investment begin to address the needs of social infrastructure?
  • What is the role of innovation and new technology to meet infrastructure needs?
  • Can the evolving infrastructure transparency principles under the Japanese presidency of the G20 process address the curse of corruption in major projects?
  • What institutional architecture would support new investment models?

 

The event’s full agenda can be downloaded here.

Frontier Sponsors:


To request an invitation to the event, send an email to mm@blended.capital with a brief description of your expertise and the contribution that you hope to make.


the white paper

To inform the discussion a White Paper proposing solutions for opening new paths to infrastructure investment has been published and can be downloaded here. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute both written and verbal comments which will then be incorporated into the final version that will be released following the forum and offered as an input to the UN Secretary General’s 2019 Climate Summit taking place on 23 September 2019.

Underpin sustainable growth

Robust, productive infrastructure for the world’s frontier economies will underpin sustainable growth and address the cascading problems driven by global inequality and changes in our natural systems. And, yet, the appetite of private institutional investors for infrastructure assets outside of the core OECD countries remains thin at best. Many of the largest pension funds, insurance reserves and sovereign wealth funds allocate less than 2% of assets to infrastructure with the bulk focused on the most developed countries. Specialist infrastructure managers respond to this clear signal down the investment chain by focusing on assets and projects within the core OECD.

the needs of frontier economies

The collective financial power of the world’s multi-lateral, regional and national development finance institutions will never match the infrastructure needs of frontier economies. And current models to finance frontier infrastructure are falling far short for a myriad of reasons ranging from corruption,through politicisation of projects, and deepening concerns around the indebtedness of the world’s least developed economies. The scale of both the inherent challenges and the investment opportunities associated with getting the “infrastructure conundrum”right are vast. By 2050 Africa will have accounted for more than 50% of global population growth over the next three decades while the potential of the continent’s socioeconomic growth and “demographic bounce” hinges on infrastructure that works for its people. Smart, resilient infrastructure builds trust, drives trade, promotes carbon-smart transport, binds communities through good old fashioned talk and communication to address a broad range of employment, health, and welfare issues,and empowers teams to deliver new solutions to old problems.